Participate online. We’d like your perspectives…

Participate

We’re very excited to be able to open up the Summit program to the wider Australian science community. A vital aspect of the Summit is the creation of a program that reflects the individual and collective goals for science communicators across Australia.

We want your input on the key challenges and opportunities for science communicators and policymakers across Australia – we’ll be taking your feedback into the each Summit workshop (below): to address individual and collective barriers across our key themes; and create a vision for science communication and engagement Australia 2050.

Whether you’re a communicator, educator, policymaker, innovator and business leader, it’s your input that counts. The invitation to contribute is open to anyone involved in communicating science within Australia, whether you’re a policymaker, communicator, scientist, journalist, educator or business person. We want your perspectives.



Select one of the five contemporary themes, and join in the conversation.

1. IT’S A TWO WAY STREET – Engaging ALL Australians in the sciences
Inspiring Australia is working to engage all Australians in the science through major initiatives such as the Unlocking Australia’s Potential grants, which has seen Inspiring Australia commission and support science engagement activities and programs across the whole of the country, and through National Science Week, Australia’s annual celebration of science which attracts an audience of 1.4 million Australians.

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2. PARTICIPATIVE SCIENCE – Encouraging the best in citizen science
Inspiring Australia, through the Unlocking Australia’s Potential grants, is supporting a number of major citizen science projects, including REDMAP, the University of Tasmania’s project which utilises the knowledge and experience of Australia’s recreational fishers and divers to map the changing distribution of marine species. In more general terms, Inspiring Australia also encourages participation in the sciences through National Science Week, the nation’s annual celebration of science which attracts an audience of 1.4 million Australians.

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3. BEYOND TWEETS AND BLOGS – Leveraging the changing media landscape
The changing media landscape poses real challenges and opportunities for science communication. Inspiring Australia is supporting a number of initiatives which capitalise on this changing environment, from ScienceAlert, which delivers news on credible, defensible and accurate science content from Australasian institutions to over 2.9 million Facebook users, to Insight Radical, which is using blogs to follow the progress of its core art-based science engagement project. Inspiring Australia itself is actively involved in the social media sphere through National Science Week’s Facebook and Twitter accounts, while also addressing issues facing the relationship between Science and the Media in general.

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4. DIMINISHING DEGREES OF SEPARATION – Developing collaborative approaches across sectors
The Inspiring Australia Report (PDF Download) provides a framework and a broad strategy for Australia to work together on improving science engagement in Australia. However, Inspiring Australia recognised the need for greater depth and more detailed action in order for all the partners to be able to effectively work together, and as a consequence commissioned six Expert Working Groups (EWGs) on specific areas of science engagement in Australia. These EWGs have each developed key recommendations on how the science community operating in specific areas can work together to improve science engagement.

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5. DATA AT WORK – Developing the evidence base to guide future action
Inspiring Australia commissioned an expert working group (EWG) to provide recommendations towards developing an evidence base on the outcomes and current state of science engagement in Australia. The EWG report, available here, has led to a number of initiatives, including a national audit of science engagement activities as commissioned by Inspiring Australia.

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MOST RECENT COMMENTS

A Few Skeptical And Science Communication Musings (After A Good Night Out) commented on the session theme
STREAM 1: It’s a two way street: engaging ALL Australians in the sciences
[...] After working at events like ScienceRewired, and looking at the efforts of science communication groups across the country (like Inspiring Australia, which supported by the Government) - perhaps Australia is in a better position than the US when it comes to looking critically at what works....
A Pint And A Periodic Table? Engaging ALL Australians In The Sciences | sciencerewired.org | commented on the session theme
STREAM 1: It’s a two way street: engaging ALL Australians in the sciences
[...] Have you been to one of these events, or helped organise one? Add your two cents by joining in conversations at the BIG Science Communication Summit stream ‘Engaging ALL Australian in the sciences’ in person or online! [...]
Rob Thomas1 commented on the session theme
STREAM 5: Data at work: developing the evidence base to guide future action
Craig Cormick I agree with this, also in the notes it is mentioned that the community developments a toolkit of suitable methods based on the agreed standards of evaluation. So a range of quality methods for practitioners to use based on their needs.
Craig Cormick commented on the session theme
STREAM 5: Data at work: developing the evidence base to guide future action
Melanie  - thanks for this. I've updated the line based on conversations on the day - but will use your text here too. CC
Melanie McKenzie commented on the session theme
STREAM 5: Data at work: developing the evidence base to guide future action
Craig Cormick Just wanted to follow up that the Issues that are listed here have misrepresented the conversations that took place (at least the ones I attended). I'm not sure where *uniform* methodologies came from. The main issues here refer to establishing standards for evaluation, with...

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